Home

Potted Seedlings

Trees & Shrubs

Ecological Services

ForestScaping

Invasive Plant Control

Ordering By Mail

Email White Oak Nursery

Contacts & Directions

Natural Landscapes

Growing Plants From Seed

Purchase Manual: Using Native Plants in Urban Landscapes

Essays & Articles

Nursery Hours, Plant Sales & Classes

Customer Comments

Related Sites

Photos of Field-Grown Trees

These photos demonstrate the benefits of planting container grown seedlings in the 5x8" tree band size. Seedlings are grown in an amended mineral soil. The roots are cultured to develop a healthy, well branched root system. There is minimal shock to the plant when transplanted so the plant adapts quickly to the site conditions and puts on rapid growth the first season.

You can expect similar results when planting native seedlings into cultivated soils or unprepared soils on natural sites .

When planted at a smaller size, native trees and shrubs transplant easily and grow rapidly. You get the same results over a short period of time, using smaller plants compared to planting larger plants or bare root stock. Lower cost allows you to purchase more plants and create larger and more diverse landscapes.

Field grown White Oak tree (Quercus alba) planted in Spring 05 starting with a 5x8"potted oak seedling.

Photo compares height in mid-summer after the first flush of growth compared to a oak seedling in a 5x8" tree band.

Growth was achieved with no supplemental irrigation during the drought of 2005. Soil is a silt loam with high clay content. Weed control was minimal.

Field grown Bur Oak tree (Quercus macrocarpa) planted in Spring 05 starting with a 5x8"potted oak seedling.

Photo compares height in mid-summer after the first flush of growth compared to a oak seedling in a 5x8" tree band.

Growth was achieved with no supplemental irrigation during the drought of 2005. Soil is a silt loam with high clay content. Weed control was minimal.

Field grown Canada Red Chokecherry (Prunus virginiana 'Canada Red') planted in Spring 05 starting with a 5x8"potted seedling.

Photo compares height in mid-summer after the first flush of growth compared to the original seedling in a 5x8" tree band.

You can see the difference in growth between species compared to the oak seedlings. Fast growing native species like Chokecherry grow much more rapidly than Oaks under the same conditions. These species are well adapted to old field conditions with lots of competing vegetative.

Growth was achieved with no supplemental irrigation during the drought of 2005. Soil is a silt loam with high clay content. Weed control was minimal.